enowning
Monday, September 05, 2011
 
Michel Haar on thinking Ereignis.
Ereignis, as much as being, even as Gestell, retains a "freedom" infinitely superior to that of man. Man can merely await Ereignis that, like the Turning, is already and is not yet, as Gestell is only the prelude. Ereignis is therefore the name given by way of anticipation to a possible "identification" between man and being, beyond metaphysics. In awaiting a new commencement, a new History, Ereignis in Heidegger's last writings disposes over man to the same extent and with the same total sovreignty as does being. In particular, it reveals that man is "used," that he speaks on inasmuch as he listens to language and belongs to it. "Ereignis appropriates man to the usage [Brauch] it makes of him." All schemas of freedom, activity, and power that were those of being are transferred to Ereignis, in the face of which man keeps the same determinations of quasi-passivity and dependency. The thought of Ereignis therefore does not fundamentally change the definition of man's essence as resulting from his relation to being, and from being's relation to him.

P. 67
The quote, from The Way to Language, is this book's own translation.
 
Comments:
"Man can merely await Ereignis ..."

Doesn't Agamben's interpretation of the passage from the discussion that follows Time and Being (and it is not clear to me whether that summary of notes reflects MH's words exactly), with the passage of beyng, indicate Appropriation is now?
 
MH used Ereignis in two different senses. One is the event of appropriation that is always going on when we appropriate things, and the other is a historical event that changes the understanding of being. By Time and Being MH appears to be using both senses: that man (or MH) understanding beyng as Ereignis is in itself a historic event. Agamben and Haar appear to be following along, trying to make sense of both understandings of Ereignis.
 
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